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Even As They Voted In The Democratic Primary, Many Marylanders Inclined To Back Hogan This Fall

“After voting in the closed primary on Tuesday, many registered Democrats – even in blue strongholds like the D.C suburbs and Baltimore – said they either planned to vote for Hogan in the general election or are strongly considering it.”


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[The Washington Post](https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/md-politics/even-as-they-voted-in-the-democratic-primary-many-marylanders-inclined-to-back-hogan-this-fall/2018/06/27/e3673fe4-79af-11e8-aeee-4d04c8ac6158_story.html?utm_campaign=website&utm_medium=email&utm_source=sg&utm_term=.ebc5f270f4e6 “Washington Post”)
Steve Thompson and Fenit Nirappil
June 27, 2018**

“In a state where Democrats outnumber Republicans 2 to 1, the popular governor so far appears to be inoculating himself from a backlash against a president many Democratic voters despise.

“After voting in the closed primary on Tuesday, many registered Democrats – even in blue strongholds like the D.C suburbs and Baltimore – said they either planned to vote for Hogan in the general election or are strongly considering it. Their comments illustrate the steep path facing Jealous, a Bernie Sanders-style liberal campaigning on a progressive platform of universal health care, debt free college and a $15 minimum wage.

“When we had the riots and all, [Hogan] he stepped in and made things calm,’ said 69-year-old Democrat Vincent Rhames, who voted for Democratic gubernatorial primary candidate Jim Shea at a high school in Northeast Baltimore.

“It seems like he’s been doing a good job, and I want to give him a chance to do more,’ said Rhames. …

“He’s been a great governor. . . He’s going to be a hard man to beat,’ said Brown, who is 62 and disabled. He paused for 20 seconds when asked if he’s ever voted for a Republican before.

“Hogan’s a good governor, man. Never say never,’ Brown said. ‘He’s got a nice presence about himself, and I can see him getting things done.’ …

“Seventy-one percent of Marylanders approve of Hogan’s job performance, according to a recent Washington Post-University of Maryland poll. That’s nine points higher than for any other Maryland governor since the late 1990s. He was unopposed in the Republican primary. 

“Hogan has frequently distanced himself from some of Trump’s more controversial positions, decrying his statements about women and breaking from the president on health-care issues and funding for the Chesapeake Bay cleanup.

“Last week, Hogan joined governors from both parties to call on the Trump administration to defend in court a portion of the Obama-era Affordable Care Act that gives coverage to those with preexisting medical conditions.

“And even as Democrats pounced on him for not standing up to the Trump administration’s separation of migrant children from their parents, Hogan was ordering a National Guard helicopter and its crew to return from New Mexico and vowing not to deploy state resources to the border until the separations stopped.

“Try as they might during the primary race, the Democratic gubernatorial candidates seemed to gain little traction in tying their foe to the unpopular president.

“There aren’t too many Larry Hogans in the modern Republican party these days,’ said Herbert Smith, a professor at McDaniel College who has studied Maryland politics for decades. ‘It’s as if he has a cloaking devise or something.’

“Hogan’s likability and appeal transcend partisanship, Herbert said. “He took social issues off the table – that has been the downfall of Maryland Republicans statewide – and he campaigns on value issues such as integrity, honesty and fiscal responsibly.’ …

“I think voters actually see him as one of them,’ she said, because he’s come off not as a slick politician but as an average guy. ‘The cancer kind of helped humanize him that way.’

“William Liou, 34, of Bethesda, who works for the federal government, voted for Baker for governor on Tuesday and said he may well vote for Hogan in the general election. ‘I don’t see a reason to vote him out,’
he said.

“Roseanne and Stephen Kane, who live in Leisure World, are both lifelong Democrats — they cast their first votes for John F. Kennedy. Roseanne Kane, 75, said she has never voted for a Republican. But this November, she and her husband said, might be different.

“I have no big problem with Hogan,’ said Stephen Kane, 79. “He’s been sufficiently responsive to both sides. What more can you ask of in a politician?”